Tom Walker and Todd Helgeson: 'Two authors, two Alaska adventurers'

2013-07-08 by News, Sports, and Art

Tom Walker is an award-winning writer and photographer who currently lives on the edge of Denali National Park. His newest book, “The Seventymile Kid: The Lost Legacy of Harry Karstens and the First Ascent of Mount McKinley,” joins his canon of more than a dozen books on Alaska wildlife and natural history.

Todd Helgeson is the author of the “Alaska Bouldering Guide,” the first guidebook to bouldering in Alaska. The book, co-written with Kelsey Gray, introduces more than 15 bouldering areas from Juneau to Fairbanks, documenting hundreds of possible problems in detail, using high quality color photographs.

This event was sponsored by the UAA Campus Bookstore. It was recorded for podcast on June 21, 2013.



Download MP3 (56:03min, 26MB)



For More Information:

Tom Walker photography
Website
Alaska Bouldering Guide
Website
UAA Campus Bookstore
Website

Mark Bedau presents 'Decision Making in Complex and Emerging Systems'

2013-07-08 by News, Sports, and Art

Mark Bedau has worked extensively on philosophical and scientific issues concerning emergence, evolution, life, mind and the social and ethical implications of creating life from scratch.

Because he combines training in analytical philosophy with more than a decade of experience in artificial life, he is internationally recognized as a leader in the development of socially and ethically responsible practices for creating life-like systems.

Bedau has been professor of philosophy and humanities at Reed College since 1991 and editor-in-chief of the Artificial Life journal since 2000. He holds a doctorate in philosophy from the University of California at Berkeley.



Download MP3 (96:19min, 44MB)



For More Information:

UAA Campus Bookstore
Website
UAA Complex Systems
Website
Mark Bedau
Bio page, Reed College

Craig Mishler on 'The Blind Man and the Loon: The Story of a Tale'

2013-07-08 by News, Sports, and Art

In “The Blind Man and the Loon: The Story of a Tale,” folklorist Craig Mishler traces the story’s emergence across Greenland and North America in manuscripts, books, visual arts, film, music and dance theater.

By examining and comparing the story’s variants and permutations across cultures in detail, Mishler brings the individual storyteller into his analysis of how the tale changed over time, considering how storytellers and the oral tradition function within various societies.

Two maps show the routes the story has traveled. The result is a masterful compilation and analysis of Native oral traditions that sheds light on how folktales are spread and adapted by widely diverse cultures.

Craig Mishler is an affiliate research professor with the Alaska Native Language Center at UAF, the editor of “Neerihiinjìk: We Traveled from Place to Place (The Gwich’in Stories of Johnny and Sarah Frank)” and the author of “The Crooked Stovepipe: Athapaskan Fiddle Music and Square Dancing in Northeast Alaska and Northwest Canada.”

This event was sponsored by the UAA Campus Bookstore and podcast on May 28, 2013.



Download MP3 (67:56min, 31MB)



For More Information:

UAA Campus Bookstore
Website
University of Chicago Press
Books by Craig Mishler

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