Climate Ethics Public Symposium Part 2: Chrisoula Andreou

2011-09-29 by

The Climate Ethics Works-in-Progress Conference hosted a free, public symposium Sept. 8, 2011, asking four senior philosophers to engage the question, “How should we think about climate change?”

Second up that evening was Chrisoula Andreou, Philosophy professor from the University of Utah. Andreou studies human procrastination, and in this talk, applied it to environmental effects.

Our seemingly trivial individual actions, like driving a car or not recycling, hardly seem significant enough to have devastating effects. So, we manage to put off changing this behavior, even if we wish to minimize our human impacts on the environment. We manage to do this because each individual act is so trivial.

In this talk, she suggests ways that we can limit that procrastination: implementation intentions and deadlines.

This talk was recorded on Sept. 8, 2011.



Download MP3 (17:03min, 16MB)



For More Information:

Climate Ethics Public Symposium
Website and poster for Symposium
Climate Ethics Works-in-Progress
Conference website
Philosopher Chrisoula Andreou
Bio page, University of Utah

Climate Ethics Public Symposium Part 1: Clark Wolf

2011-09-19 by

The Climate Ethics Works-in-Progress Conference hosted a free, public symposium Sept. 8, 2011, asking four senior philosophers to engage the question, “How should we think about climate change?”

First up that evening was Clark Wolf, Director of Bioethics and a professor in both philosophy and political science at Iowa State University. In his talk, he encourages us to consider framing the question of climate change between our generation and future generations as a problem of justice. When we don’t meet our obligations of justice, he argues, we create victims, and they can seek remedy. He asks us tobe accountable for our environmental debt to future generations.

This talk was recorded on Sept. 8, 2011.



Download MP3 (23:01min, 21MB)



For More Information:

Climate Ethics Public Symposium
Website and poster for Symposium
Climate Ethics Works-in-Progress
Conference website
Philosopher Clark Wolf
Bio page at Iowa State University

Climate Ethics Conference: Philosopher Chrisoula Andreou on how procrastination can interfere with our environmental intentions

2011-09-07 by

Philosopher Chrisoula Andreou studies how humans make decisions. She says that even if we could all agree on how to stem climate change, our own individual actions might be hard for us to complete, procrastination being the culprit.

Andreou is one of four philosophers on the symposium panel Sept. 8 at 7:30 p.m. in LIB 307, answering the question: How should we think about climate change? The event is free and open to the public.

This phone interview was recorded Sept. 5, 2011.



Download MP3 (9:12min, 11MB)



For More Information:

Climate Ethics Works in Progress Conference Sept. 8-9, 2011
Conference website
Green & Gold News
Conference story
Philosopher Chrisoula Andreou
Bio page, University of Utah

Climate Ethics Conference: Philosopher Bryan Norton on devising an environmental decision-making process that brings all interests to the table

2011-09-07 by

Philosopher Bryan Norton has been studying sustainability for decades. His concern for the well-being of future generations led him to build upon Aldo Leopold’s ecosystem perspective. What we need to sustain our planet, he says, is a decision-making process that accommodates ALL values—human, environmental and economic.

Norton is one of four philosophers on the symposium panel Sept. 8 at 7:30 p.m. in LIB 307, answering the question: How should we think about climate change?

This phone interview was recorded Sept. 5, 2011.



Download MP3 (10:36min, 12MB)



For More Information:

Climate Change Works-In-Progress Conference Sept. 8-9, 2011
Conference website
Green & Gold News
Conference story
Philosopher Bryan Norton
Bio page, Georgia Institute of Technology

Climate Ethics Conference: Philosopher Clark Wolf on being accountable for our environmental debt

2011-09-03 by

Clark Wolf teaches philosophy and political science at Iowa State University, with an emphasis on resource sustainability and future generations. Here he previews ideas in the paper he’ll deliver at the Sept. 8-9 Climate Ethics Conference at UAA.

Wolf is one of four philosophers on the symposium panel Sept. 8 at 7:30 p.m. in LIB 307, answering the question: How should we think about climate change? The symposium is free and open to the public.

This interview was recorded Sept. 2, 2011.



Download MP3 (7:28min, 7MB)



For More Information:

Climate Ethics Works in Progress Conference Sept. 8-9, 2011
Conference website
Philosopher Clark Wolf
Bio page at Iowa State University
Green & Gold
Conference announcement

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