The Growing Nationalist Populism: Its Impact on the British “Brexit” Vote and on European and Global Politics

2017-04-20 by

Mr. Persson discusses how and why British and other voters in Europe and globally have been affected by ideas and opinions which, for the most part, contradict liberal and Western values strenuously upheld and cherished during and after the Cold War, political ideas which clearly resemble those that brought Europe to disaster twice during the twentieth century. The traditional role and fundamental value of the United States in upholding and defending those values, and in creating the most successful peace project ever, the European Union, will also be discussed.



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UAS Professor Emeritus Clive Thomas cutting Alaska’s budget

2016-09-29 by News, Sports, and Art

Guest lecturer Clive Thomas will present “The Politics of Cutting Alaska State Budget: Fallacies and Realities” on Thursday, Sept. 29, beginning at 7:30 p.m. in room 307 of the UAA/APU Consortium Library.

A common demand by many Alaskans and some first-time candidates for state office is that the state budget needs to be cut, largely because of wasted money and inefficiencies. This presentation shows that, contrary to common belief, while budgets can be cut in the short term, as they were in the 2016 legislative session, the trend in the long term is for larger budgets. This explanation is based on the realities of what makes up the state budget, constituent pressure on politicians, and the lack of an organized and sustained political force promoting long-term budget reductions.

Clive Thomas, who taught political science in Juneau for thirty years, is editor of a book just published by the University of Alaska Press, Alaska Politics and Public Policy: The Dynamics of Beliefs, Institutions, Personalities and Power. He is now a senior fellow at the Foley Institute of Politics at Washington State University.

This event is part of the William H. Seward Lecture Series, hosted by the UAA Department of Political Science. The series features timely and provocative lectures at UAA during the academic year on a range of subjects dealing with current politics, public policy and Alaska. Lectures are free and open to members of the general public.



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Guest lecturer James Nichols discusses influence of Rome on U.S. Constitution

2016-09-17 by News, Sports, and Art

The Roman Republic experienced impressive success—somewhat surprisingly in view of frequent struggles between nobles and common people—but eventually lost its republican constitution in the transformation to the Roman Empire’s one-man rule.

This lecture examines both what the founders learned from the successes of Rome’s example and what they sought to avoid from Rome’s failings. It also seeks to clarify some distinctive features of the American Constitution, as seen against the background of the Roman example.

James H. Nichols Jr., is professor of government and Dr. Jules L. Whitehill Professor of Humanism and Ethics at Claremont McKenna College and Avery Fellow at Claremont Graduate University.

His B.A., with a major in classics and political philosophy, is from Yale, and his Ph.D. in government is from Cornell. He has also taught at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; the Graduate Faculty of the New School for Social Research in New York; and Yale University in Connecticut.

He worked for a year at the National Endowment for the Humanities in Washington as associate director of the Division of General Programs.

His publications include Epicurean Political Philosophy: On the De rerum natura of Lucretius (Cornell University Press, 1976); translations with introduction, notes, and interpretive essays of Plato’s Gorgias and Phaedrus (Cornell University Press, 1998); and articles on pragmatism, human rights, ancient understandings of technology, Plato’s view of philosophic education, liberalism, political economy and Tacitus.

His most recent book is Alexandre Kojève: Wisdom at the End of History (Rowman & Littlefield, 2007); his most recent article is “On Leo Strauss’ ‘Notes on Lucretius’” in Brill’s Companion to Leo Strauss’ Writings on Classical Political Thought, ed. T. Burns (Brill, 2016).

This 12th annual Constitution Day lecture is part of the Chartwell Lecture Series, hosted by the UAA Department of Political Science.



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Chartwell Lecture: Hanna Shelest on 'The Ukraine Crisis'

2016-04-15 by

Revolutionary protests in Ukraine in winter 2014 resulted in the annexation of Crimea by Russia and an anti-terrorist operation launched by Kyiv in Eastern Ukraine.

What began as a totally internal manifestation of displeasure with governmental policy was transformed into an international security crisis. While Kyiv considers it a Russian-Ukrainian conflict, Moscow perceives it as a confrontation between Russia and the West, claiming that the crisis was provoked by NATO’s desire to expand into the region where Russia’s vital interests lie.

After two years, the situation has become more complex, undermining the role of international organizations such as the UN and the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) in security and conflict resolution, challenging the norms of classical warfare and the traditional definition of aggression, and engendering threats leading to militarization but also provoking intervention in another crisis (in Syria) in order to distract attention and to return to diplomacy and international negotiation.

Hanna Shelest is editor-in-chief of Ukraine Analytica and Curator of the Ukrainian Peacebuilding School. For more than 10 years she was a senior researcher at the Odessa branch of the National Institute for Strategic Studies. An expert on Ukrainian foreign policy, she is a frequent media commentator and presenter at international conferences. Her research interests focus on conflict resolution, security, and cooperation, especially in the wider Black Sea region and the Middle East.

Dr. Shelest was a Rotary Peace Fellow in 2010, a Black Sea Young Reformer in 2011, a John Smith Fellow in 2012, and a visiting research fellow at the NATO Defense College in Rome in 2014.

She is currently serving as a Marshall Fund Memorial Fellow, and the Department of Political Science is grateful to the generosity of the German Marshall Fund, which has made it possible for her to deliver this Chartwell Lecture on her first visit to Alaska.



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Chartwell Lecture: 'Turkey, ISIS, and the Implications for the United States'

2016-03-03 by News, Sports, and Art

In the first Chartwell Lecture of 2016, Professor Sinan Ciddi, director of the Institute for Turkish Studies at Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service, speaks on: “Turkey, ISIS, and the Implications for the United States.” Please join us for a fascinating look at political changes in Turkey, one of America’s NATO allies, and how the future of the Middle East will be affected by Turkish and American foreign policies toward ISIS. Organized by the Department of Political Science at the University of Alaska Anchorage, the Chartwell Lectures are free and open to the public. For more information about this and upcoming lectures in the Chartwell and the William H. Seward Lecture Series, please visit the UAA Department of Political Science webpage.



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